Dozen Editions № 7: Mt Fuji Above Late Autumn Fields
Dozen Editions № 7: Mt Fuji Above Late Autumn Fields
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Dozen Editions № 7: Mt Fuji Above Late Autumn Fields

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Mt Fuji is, without a doubt, one of the most visually distinctive elements of Japan that stands in as a symbol for the nation. Rightly so, too. It is the tallest mountain in Japan and has a striking, symmetrical profile that is capped in snow for much of the year. It has been a major theme in Japanese art for more than 1,600 years and shows up just about everywhere, from corporate logos to murals in public baths to Mt-Fuji-shaped glassware.

I live in Saitama City, just to the north of Tokyo, and Mt Fuji is sometimes visible on cloudless days and with a clear line of sight. It’s far enough away that it doesn’t dominate the horizon, instead punctuating it. It’s easy to miss if you’re not looking for it, but  beautiful if you do.

When I made this photograph, I was on my way home from helping at a cycling event held in late November. I stopped to look around from the crest of a levee that helps corral the Arakawa River during typhoon season. The sun was setting, backlighting the clouds and the dry grasses in the fields below. It simultaneously revealed Mt Fuji in silhouette, floating just above the tree line.

It was an incredibly beautiful moment that I was happy to have been able to capture, but which I would also have been grateful to experience without a camera in hand. We must relish the moments when the world reveals itself to us like this. We must never take it for granted. I am glad to be able to share this moment with you.


Original photography by David R Munson. Captured in November 2015 in Saitama City, Saitama Prefecture, Japan.

The image size is about 6x9 inches, printed on high-quality 8x10 inch Hahnemühle photo gloss baryta paper using archival inks. This print is part of a project in which I will release a new print in an open edition every month.

I have always preferred to print my work in smaller sizes. Smaller prints are more intimate. They don’t dominate a space, but rather punctuate it and invite you to get closer. You have to get closer to them to examine their contents. This is something I value as both an artist and a collector of art.

Prints ship from San Antonio, Texas, in the United States.